The BRADLEY DEPARTMENT of ELECTRICAL and COMPUTER ENGINEERING

ECE 3704 Continuous and Discrete System Theory | ECE | Virginia Tech

Undergraduate PROGRAMS

Course Information

Description

Continuous- and discrete-time system theory. Block diagrams, feedback, and stability theory. Continuous-time stability, differential equations, Laplace-transforms, transfer functions. Discrete-time stability, difference equations, Z-transforms. Transfer functions and frequency response. Sampling of continuous systems and an introduction to control and filter design. Hands-on projects to illustrate and integrate the various continuous- and discrete-time concepts and tools.

Why take this course?

Signals and systems concepts arise in a wide variety of science and engineering fields. The ability to apply linear systems theory is essential to the disciplines of electrical and computer engineering and is the foundation of many upper level courses.

Learning Objectives

  • 1. Describe general systems with the use of block diagrams.
  • 2. Solve differential equations using Laplace-transforms.
  • 3. Analyze stability and performance of continuous-time systems with Laplace-transforms and transfer functions.
  • 4. Solve difference equations using Z-transforms.
  • 5. Analyze stability and performance of discrete-time systems with Z-transforms and transfer functions.
  • 6. Sample continuous-time systems to create a discrete-time system model.
  • 7. Make experimental measurements on a continuous-time physical system and compare the results to time and frequency-domain analytical results.
  • 8. Make experimental measurements on a discrete-time physical system and compare the results to time and frequency-domain analytical results.

Course Topics

Topic

Percentage of Course

Laplace Transforms 10%
Laplace-domain analysis, transfer functions, stability 20%
Z-Transforms 10%
Z-domain analysis, transfer functions, stability 20%
Filter Design in continuous and discrete domains 10%
Conversion to/from discrete and continuous signals 10%
Applications to cyber-physical systems 20%